With The Flying Squadron: The War Letters of Harold Rosher

“Many of them are quite ordinary; most are spiced with slang; the long ones describing his share in the great historic raids are thrillingly dramatic. But it would not be wise to set some letters above others. None should be missed. Each contributes its due realistic share to the complete picture of an airman’s life in war.” – Arnold Bennett

4 August 1914. Britain went to war.

Harold Rosher instantly applied for a commission in the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS).

Rosher’s letters follow him from pilot training through to his daring few years as an RNAS pilot.

Primarily supporting the British Expeditionary Force along the Belgian coast with No.1 Wing RNAS, Rosher flew a number of different aircraft and a variety of missions.

The letters are a mix of humour and tragedy, funny stories and tragic losses. They are rich with historical relevance. But most importantly they are the personal letters of a young man to his family.

Three days after the final letter, Harold Rosher died testing an aircraft over Dover.

With the Flying Squadron provides a valuable account of RNAS activities and the daily life of pilots at the dawn of military aviation.

Harold Rosher (1893-1916) was a pilot in the Royal Naval Air Service from 1914-1916 when he died in an aircraft accident over Dover.

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